Paws In Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center

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Canine Rehab, similar to physical therapy in human medicine, is ideal for dogs that have been injured, undergone surgery or who suffer from arthritis, obesity, or neurological disease. By using Rehabilitation techniques and modalities we can maximize your pet’s ability to recover physically while minimizing his/her pain. Some signs of pain and discomfort are as follows: Sleeps more/ Restlessness, especially at night Lethargic, doesn’t want to walk as much or at all, Cannot jump onto bed or sofa, Pants more, Lameness, Stiffness, Whines or moans for no apparent reason, Irritability or personality changes, any or all of the above but doesn’t seem or act painful. Below is a list of services that we offer.

  • Weave Cones
    • When walking through vertical weave cones it helps develop coordination and balance while learning to turn and pivot.
  • Initial Assessment
    • To begin an assessment, the patient is observed at rest and at several gaits. General palpation is performed to determine proper symmetry and muscle atrophy. Postural reflexes, ROM measurements and proprioception testing are performed. Every tendon, ligament, muscle and joint from the tip of the nose to the tail is assessed.
  • Cavaletti Rails
    • Helps dogs learn how to negotiate obstacles and walk over them by lifting their limbs to the appropriate height.
  • Underwater Treadmill
    • This is effective for improving strength, muscular endurance, cardio respiratory endurance, ROM, agility, psychological well-being, while minimizing pain; beneficial for post-op fractures, Cranial Cruciate Ligament stabilization, neurological conditions, tendinitis, and conditioning.
  • LASER (Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation)
    • LASER is used to accelerate wound and joint healing, to promote muscle regeneration, acute and chronic pain control, decrease edema (swelling), neurological conditions, and post–op care. It is measured in Joules/cm² (dose of laser energy).
  • Dry Needling
    • Dry Needling is the use of either solid filiform needles (acupuncture needles) or hollow-core hypodermic needles for muscle pain from trigger points (knots); sometimes known as intramuscular stimulation.
  • Gulick
    • A measuring tape with a spring tension device used to measure limb circumference. Measures muscle mass around thigh.
  • Goniometer
    • Device measures joint angles of flexion and extension. The measurements are given in degrees.
  • ESTIM (Electrical Stimulation)
    • Helps to increase muscle strength, muscle re-education, increasing ROM, correction of structural abnormalities, improving muscle tone, accelerating wound healing, edema (swelling) reduction, muscle spasm reduction, and enhancing trans dermal administration of medication.
  • TENS (Trans cutaneous Electrical Stimulation Nerve Stimulation)
    • TENS works transcutaneously (through the skin) through surface electrodes to excite nerves
  • Massage
    • Is the manipulation of the soft tissues of the body, helps to relieve stress, anxiety and discomfort, helps to reduce muscle spasms and soft tissue discomfort, relief from pain, reduce tension, and help to sedate the nervous system
    • Techniques: Stroking, Effleurage, Petrissage, Compressions
  • Stretching
    • Improves flexibility of the joints and extensibility of periarticular tissues (tissues around a joint), muscles and tendons; beneficial with conditions like shortening of tissues, reduced mobility, injury and neurological conditions.
  • PROM (Passive Range of Motion)
    • Is useful to diminish the effects of disuse and immobilization. There is no muscle contraction performed, helps to decrease pain and improves rate of recovery.
  • Balance Board
    • Is used to provide balance and proprioceptive training from the forelimbs or side to side

Here is a link to our Rehabilitation website page

https://www.fosteranimalhospital.com/veterinary-services/canine-rehabilitation.html

 

To Flex or Not to Flex?

To flex or not to flex? That was the question I asked myself during my canine rehabilitation therapy this week. Candace, my certified canine rehabilitation assistant, was making me do all sorts of yoga poses today!

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I have to say that it does feel really good! It helps take away all my tension.

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It also makes me limber so I can do more exercising on the treadmill to help build up the muscle around my knees. I have to admit, I used to think that canine rehabilitation wouldn’t help me feel better, but wow, was I ever wrong!

Yoga 1

 

All of this therapy is making me feel great! I may be 8 human years old, but you would never know it! I bounce around like a puppy again! I can’t wait for my next canine rehabilitation therapy session!

Until next time,

~Amadeus

Clarence’s Rehabilitation Journey Part 1

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My name is Candace Lafond. I am a Certified Canine Rehabilitation Assistant (CCRA). I have many patients that come in and out of our Paws In Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center weekly. All of them have their own great personalities that I have become attached to. There is one patient’s story that has stood out, and his name is Clarence Wines. Clarence is a bloodhound/ lab mix weighing at 105 pounds.

One day he was outside playing in the back yard when all of a sudden he went down to the ground and was unable to use his rear legs. Clarence’s owners took him straight to Carolina Veterinary Specialist Emergency. The diagnosis given was called Fibrocartilaginous Embolism (FCE). This event occurs when the material on the inside of a vertebral disk enters the blood stream and travels to the spinal cord where it causes a blood vessel obstruction. The results are usually weakness and paralyzation in one or both rear legs. The process is not painful but complete recovery is unlikely.

Clarence’s owners heard about Paws In Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center, located at Foster Animal Hospital, from one of our regular clients, Mrs. Cline. Mr. and Mrs. Wines called and set up an appointment for a Rehabilitation Assessment with Dr. Stephen Foster, DVM, CCRT. I  made sure all of the referral paperwork was completed and returned from South Ridge Veternary Clinic, who Clarence is a regular patient of.

During the Rehabilitation Assessment we found that Clarence could now use his right rear leg but had no use of his left rear leg. Because Clarence is a larger dog he had to have a Walk-A-Bout Harness that his owners could use around his rear legs to help support him while walking. The rehabilitation assessment checked every joint, ligament and muscle from the tip of his nose to the tip of his tail. Dr. Stephen Foster followed up with Clarence’s owners and recommended Clarence come in three times a week for rehabilitation. Clarence’s owners scheduled his first rehab appointment that next week.

Hey Friends!

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It’s Amadeus again. I’m so glad to see you! I’ve been doing a lot of relaxing lately. I even missed a week of my rehab therapy because mom had to go out of town for a work seminar & I got to lay around all week.

I didn’t realize how much I needed my rehab therapy twice a week until after mom came back in town. Oh boy! When I went back to Paws In Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center to see Candace, I could tell I really needed my therapy!

Amadeus

Candace was doing my soft tissue massage therapy like usual and all of a sudden I could feel my back muscles start to twitch. They were hurting. I didn’t realize how bad my back could feel just by missing a week of therapy. I sure am glad that Candace is working on my muscles to make them feel better and stop them from hurting.

I don’t ever want to miss another Canine Rehabilitation appointment!

~Amadeus

My Rehab Experience…

Amadeus

Today my adventures brought me to Paws In Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center at Foster Animal Hospital. Dr. Steve Foster evaluated me from head to toe to see if I need rehab. I was shocked that he found some problems. I know I’ve been having knee issues and a bit of pain in my lower back, but I never thought it was something that rehab therapy could help with.

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Dr. Foster told my mom what he found during my Rehabilitation Assessment. He told her that I have lower back pain. This is something I’ve been hiding from mom, so I’m glad Dr. Foster finally told her so we can make it go away. He also told her that my knee caps are loose. I can feel my knees popping in and out but I didn’t know rehab could make them better. He found all my muscle knots on the front part of my thighs, too.

Amadeus

Mom was glad that Dr. Foster found these problems that I’ve been hiding from her. She was excited to know that Dr. Foster and Candace Lafond are certified in Canine Rehabilitation and they can help me feel better! I started my rehabilitation therapy today and it felt really good! Candace does massage therapy on my legs to help loosen my muscle knots and I get LASER therapy to reduce inflammation in my knees and lower back. When I get my LASER therapy, I get to wear these cool shades called “Doggles” to protect my eyes. Dr. Foster and Candace wear a pair too. Don’t we look cool?

Amadeus Doggles

I’m going to Paws In Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center two times a week so I will have updates for you as I go along. I can’t wait to feel the results of my new therapy! Thank you Dr. Foster & Candace for helping me feel great again!

~Amadeus