From the desk of docsef- Rehab Bloopers!

REHAB BLOOPERS

So we recently updated our Foster Animal Hospital, P.A. website. I hope you have the time to peruse it!

Foster Animal Hospital Website

In addition to our redone site we created a tab for our Canine Rehabilitation arm, Paws In Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center.

 Paws In Motion

Furthermore on the PIM page, we included several videos of which one is “What is Rehab”.

The “What is Rehab” video is a particular favorite of mine. Why you ask? Well, I don’t think I have laughed that hard in a long time.

Do you remember the old Carol Burnett Show? Much of the humor came from the live production. Carol Burnett, and Harvey Korman, and Tim Conway are comic geniuses. However, with the live production, many times they would crack each other up but try their best not to laugh on live TV.

Well our efforts were on video and not live TV, but we do have some bloopers to show for it! (we deleted some bloopers to protect the innocent!)

Follow the link and enjoy!

Bloopers

All the best,

Stephen E Foster, DVM, CCRT

Foster Animal Hospital, P.A.

Foster Animal Clinic at Parkway Commons

Paws In Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center

730 Concord Parkway North

Concord, NC 28027

704-786-0104

sfoster@fosteranimalhospital.com

From docsef’s desk- Parasite Prevention

Mayday. Mayday. Parasite Prevention is needed because heartworms, ticks, and fleas are headed our way!

I feel like in my last few blogs and now with this one, I am beating a dead horse.

https://www.fosteranimalhospital.com/blog/tis-the-season/

https://www.fosteranimalhospital.com/blog/lyme-disease-what-every-dog-owner-in-cabarrus-county-should-know/

https://www.fosteranimalhospital.com/blog/2017/02/

However, the first sentence above really is true. Heartworms, ticks, and fleas are heading our way. No, they actually are already here.

Just this week:

  • I have diagnosed a dog with heartworms who has been on heartworm prevention for the last 10 months but was probably exposed prior to taking the prevention.
  • I have seen a dog infested with ticks who was not on tick prevention.  And I have had other owners tell me they have found ticks on their dog.
  • I have treated several cases of Flea Allergic Dermatitis that only results from a flea infestation.
  • Heck, I found a tick on myself this past weekend!

And these cases are just mine. Compound that with my colleagues within our practice, or my colleagues within Cabarrus County, or even my colleagues in the Charlotte region and the numbers will grow exponentially. And all the while, this doesn’t even include pets that haven’t been to a vet this spring!

So here are my recommendations:

  1. Have your dog tested for heartworms every year. Do this even if he is on heartworm prevention. (see the first bullet point above)
  2. Keep your dog and cat on heartworm prevention year-round. Please understand- there is not enough cold weather in Cabarrus County/Charlotte region to kill the mosquitoes (that spread heartworms) and other pests to warrant not protecting year-round. And understand that heartworm prevention also prevents intestinal parasites that also are unfazed by our mild winter temperatures.
  3. Stay on tick and flea prevention year-round! (see point two above about our so-called winters)
  4. Use products that have great safety data, are newer generation, and are proven to work. Need some suggestions? Here you go:

Heartworm Preventatives we at Foster Animal Hospital sell, recommend, and use on our pets:

Cats: Revolution- Prevents HW, intestinal worms, ear mites, fleas and flea eggs. 

Dogs: Proheart- 6 months injection that prevents HW and is guaranteed to prevent certain intestinal worms. ProHeart 6 Logo

Trifexis- monthly chewable for HW, intestinal worms, and fleas but NOT ticks. 

Interceptor Plus- monthly chewable for HW and intestinal worms. 

 

Flea and Tick Preventatives we at Foster Animal Hospital sell, recommend, and use on our pets:

Cats: Revolution- Prevents HW, intestinal worms, ear mites, fleas and flea eggs but not ticks. 

Cats: Bravecto Topical- Fleas and ticks that lasts 3 months. BRAVECTO Topical Solution for Cats

Dogs: Bravecto Chewable- 3 month prevention of fleas and ticks. BRAVECTO pork flavor tasty chew

Vectra 3-D Topical- Fleas, flea eggs, ticks, mosquitoes, biting flies, mites, and lice.

There are numerous products on the market. These are the current ones we sell at Foster Animal Hospital and Foster Animal Clinic at Parkway Commons. Our staff is trained and more than happy to help you in your decision.

And I am a phone call or email away with any questions or concerns you may have!

 

All the best,

Stephen E Foster, DVM, CCRT

Foster Animal Hospital, P.A.

Foster Animal Clinic at Parkway Commons

Paws In Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center

730 Concord Parkway North

Concord, NC 28027

704-786-0104

sfoster@fosteranimalhospital.com

From the desk of docsef

Thunderstorms. Fireworks. Text message alerts. Alarm beeps. Guns during hunting season. Construction. Screaming children. TV sound-effects. Traffic noise.

We’ve all heard these and are usually unfazed. (I know some will faze!) But what about your dog? Is she fazed by any of these? Does she start to shake, pant, pace, cling, whine, hide, etc.? Studies show at least one-third of dogs suffer from noise aversion.

For years our pets just had to suffer through it. Sure we tried tranquilizers or other anti-anxiety medicines only to find the storm passed and NOW Fido is sleeping. In recent years innovations like pheromone therapy and thundershirts have helped many. Recently, a new medication called Sileo has been launched. While not perfect, I have been very pleased with the effects. Even for my own dog.

Basically, Sileo is a micro-dose of a commonly use veterinary sedative. It is administered orally and is absorbed by the mucosa of the dog’s gums. It will not worked if swallowed. Because it is a micro-dose, anxiety is relieved with virtually no sedation. My dog Vesey has responded very well to Sileo. I have even used it for her travel anxiety, even though it is not labeled for that issue. My thought is: anxiety is anxiety.

So if your pup doesn’t “enjoy the noise”, give us a call. Sileo may just be the ticket for her!

All the best,

Stephen E Foster, DVM, CCRT

Foster Animal Hospital, P.A.

Foster Animal Clinic at Parkway Commons

Paws In Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center

730 Concord Parkway North

Concord, NC 28027

704-786-0104

sfoster@fosteranimalhospital.com

Tis The Season!

What? You say it’s not December, and that much is true. But May tis the season to be worried! Worried about heartworms that is. In all actuality we should be worried year-round about heartworms because in the southeast US, heartworm disease is a year-round concern. And for those that aren’t aware, heartworm disease is not just limited to dogs. Cats can develop heartworms and do so at a similar rate that they contract Feline Leukemia Virus infections.

So here are the facts:

  1. Heartworms are spread to dogs and cats by mosquitoes. You know, those pesky little blood-suckers that attack you and me! Remember how mild our winter was this year? If not, the mosquitoes sure do, because they never died off this winter! In fact, Orkin recently ranked Charlotte #9 on their top 50 list of “Mosquito Cities”. (Move over cardinals, we have a new state bird)
  2. It takes 6 months from initial exposure until the heartworms are mature in the heart of dogs and the lungs of cats.
  3. Dogs- Heartworm tests, preventatives, and treatments are very safe and effective.
  4. Cats- Heartworm tests are not reliable. There is no approved treatment. Prevention is the best and ONLY answer.
  5. Many heartworm positive pets are indoor-only or indoor-primarily.
  6. Permanent heart and lung damage will occur with heartworm disease and worse yet death can occur. Oftentimes in cats, sudden death is the only sign of heartworm disease.
  7. The American Heartworm Society ( www.heartwormsociety.org ) recently released the Heartworm Incidence Map for 2016. 
  8. If you didn’t study the map, scroll up and look again. And then look at North Carolina. And then look at the Charlotte region. We are the darkest red and that is scary.

So, what should you do?

Dog owners: Have your dog tested annually (whether on prevention or not). Give heartworm prevention, on schedule, year-round. We use and recommend- Proheart, Trifexis, Interceptor Plus, and Heartgard. If possible, avoid mosquito laden areas. If that is not reality for you, consider using a mosquito repelling product like Vectra 3-D when in those areas. (Vectra 3-D is NOT a heartworm preventative. It is for fleas and ticks and will repel mosquitoes)

Cat owners: Keep your cats on heartworm prevention year round, even if they are indoor only. We recommend and sell Revolution. The beauty of Revolution is that it prevents heartworms in cats and also kills fleas, ear mites, and some intestinal worms.

 

Remember it only takes one mosquito bite. I had a mosquito come through my front door with me last night and she wasn’t even invited!

As usual, feel free to call or email me with any questions or concerns. Heartworm disease is a reality. Sadly, it is a reality that is entirely preventable.

 

All the best,

Stephen E Foster, DVM, CCRT

Foster Animal Hospital, P.A.

Foster Animal Clinic at Parkway Commons

Paws In Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center

730 Concord Parkway North

Concord, NC 28027

704-786-0104

sfoster@fosteranimalhospital.com