Hidden Dangers May Be A Mouth Away

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For years it was optional for our dog and cat owners to choose whether they wanted dental x-rays for their pets. For the last year, ALL of our dental patients have received dental x-rays. Why you say? Because on a routine physical exam it is impossible to perform a complete dental exam. We now know on the anesthetized dental patient, it is also impossible to perform a complete dental exam without dental x-rays.*  We know this because the dental x-rays have revealed hidden dangers.

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Take Fido Doe, a recent dental patient of ours. Fido’s teeth were graded a P1 by the veterinarian. (P0 -P4 is our grade standard with P0 being the best) Once anesthetized, Fido’s teeth were x-rayed. The x-rays revealed root fractures of many teeth. There is no way to determine when this happened or why. But the fact remains these teeth had hidden issues that only dental x-rays could find. There is also no way to know how much pain Fido had been in. Dogs and cats are masters at hiding pain. I call it a survival instinct.

Another case in point is Emmy, my own 12 year old Miniature Schnauzer. She had a routine dental performed in June of last year. Dr. Mark Plott and his team performed dental x-rays. Emmy’s right upper canine tooth was basically dead. She had shown no obvious signs of pain and discomfort at home. When they cleaned the tartar from that tooth, there was a slight discoloration near the gum line. Without the x-rays we would have never known about the advanced nature of her problem and her pain. The recommendation was to remove the tooth. Once she healed from the extraction, she was like a new dog. She was playing often and hard with our new puppy. Even acting like the puppy herself!

Dental cleanings are not cheap for dogs and cats. At least they are not cheap at Foster Animal Hospital compared to other places. (no two vet hospitals practice vet medicine the same) The service received here is not cheap either. There is a high value for what we do before, during and after dental treatments. If nothing more, just the fact that we now routinely find hidden dangers during a routine dental treatment by taking x-rays can save your pet years of oral pain and discomfort. And can ultimately save you money. That’s why having a yearly dental  treatment is the best recommendation we can make.

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*Note- all dental procedures require anesthesia. Our patients won’t sit in the chair with their mouths open!!

For more information on what our Dental Treatment includes visit here:

https://www.fosteranimalhospital.com/veterinary-services/pet-dental-care.html, or give us a call today at 704-786-0104.

Links for more information on this important topic:

https://www.fosteranimalhospital.com/blog/?m=201612

https://www.avdc.org/ownersinfo.html

https://www.avdc.org/radiographs.html

 

All the best,

Stephen E Foster, DVM, CCRT

Foster Animal Hospital, P.A.

Foster Animal Clinic at Parkway Commons

Paws In Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center

730 Concord Parkway North

Concord, NC 28027

704-786-0104

sfoster@fosteranimalhospital.com

Refer A Friend!

We love referrals! And we want to reward those clients that refer their friends, family, neighbors, etc.
So, when you refer a friend we will give you a $10 credit on your account here (with the standard small print “not redeemable for cash”!) and we will also give your friend a $10 credit on their account.
The credit can be used for any service or product we have here at Foster Animal Hospital, Foster Animal Clinic at Parkway Commons, or Paws In Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center.
Refer A Friend today!
Thanks!

Thank-You

All the best,

Stephen E Foster, DVM, CCRT

Foster Animal Hospital, P.A.

Foster Animal Clinic at Parkway Commons

Paws In Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center

730 Concord Parkway North

Concord, NC 28027

704-786-0104

sfoster@fosteranimalhospital.com

Lyme Disease: What every dog owner in Cabarrus County should know

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NC 2016 CAPC

The top map shows the potential risk for Lyme Disease in each state in the United States. The Companion Animal Parasite Council, aka CAPC, currently shows Cabarrus County as having a “moderate risk of infection” by Lyme Disease in dogs. And the trend is upward.

In short, what should you do:

  • Have your dog screened for Lyme Disease, and other tick related diseases on a routine basis. At both of our sites, routine annual blood tests and diagnostic panels screen for Lyme Disease, Ehrlichiosis, and Anaplasmosis. Unfortunately, there is no easy screen for Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. (The CAPC Data graph above shows the number of Lyme positive cases in North Carolina in 2016, as compared to, other parasitic infections.)
  • Provide tick protection year-round for your dogs and cats. As shown by this winter (2016-17), cold weather is not long enough and consistent enough to kill out those pesky ticks in our area.
  • Be aware that traveling to Lyme endemic areas carries risks for you and your dog. (See the map above.)
  • Consider vaccinating your dog against Lyme Disease. Vaccination should be done if you are traveling to an endemic area, spend time in the outdoors with your dog hiking and exploring, or suffer from tick exposure regularly. There may be other risk factors unique to your lifestyle and environment. The vaccines are safe and effective.
  • Signs of Lyme Disease in your dog include: fever, shifting leg lameness, swollen joints, enlarged lymph nodes, lethargy, depression, and anorexia. In general, clinical improvement is observed following initiation of antibiotic therapy. Lyme Disease may also persist in a chronic form resulting in poly-arthritis and kidney damage.

Like most diseases, prevention is the best policy. We use and recommend the following products:

 

vectra 3d

BravectoK9

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crlyme_product

I know I have blogged about ticks and Lyme Disease already. Our staff chose March as “Tick” month. This is because our doctors and staff feel very strongly that our clients be aware of the issues ticks can create in their pets. So please forgive me for being repetitive. We just feel that strongly about protecting your pets AND YOU from Lyme Disease!

I have included some links for your use:

https://www.capcvet.org/capc-recommendations/lyme-disease/

https://www.capcvet.org/parasite-prevalence-maps/

https://www.fosteranimalhospital.com/blog/

 

 

All the best,

Stephen E Foster, DVM, CCRT

Foster Animal Hospital, P.A.

Foster Animal Clinic at Parkway Commons

Paws In Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center

730 Concord Parkway North

Concord, NC 28027

704-786-0104

sfoster@fosteranimalhospital.com

Got Wildlife? Got Dogs?

You’ve seen them all: possum, raccoons, squirrels, deer, rats, etc. They’re in our yards, our woods, our streets. They’re pretty much everywhere. Most are lovely to look at (sorry possums and rats), but some can be spreading a hidden hazard. A hazard that can have life-threatening consequences for your dogs….. and even for you.

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I’m talking about Leptospirosis or Lepto for short. Lepto is a bacterial infection that can be spread by an infected animal through it’s urine and other body fluids. It enters the body through mucus membranes (mouth, nose, etc.), through scratches or abrasions on the skin, and potentially through bite wounds. The disease, if untreated, can cause kidney and liver failure in dogs. And oh by the way, it can cause the same in people. Lepto can even cause death. You may have recently seen reports about a person that died in New York and two others who were sick from Lepto. It has been reported that as many as 50 dogs have been infected in Phoenix. Most experts have felt that Lepto is a rare likelihood but other reports show Lepto is emerging more and more. Perhaps the reports from New York and Phoenix support this.

The purpose of this blog is not to scare you, but to inform you. We recommend vaccinating against Lepto and use the vaccine as one of our core vaccines. Many clinics and hospitals do not. As with any vaccine, we make sure your pet is medically able to be vaccinated prior to administering it.

I have researched to try and find the incidence of Lepto in our area. Unfortunately, I have not been able to find accurate info from a reliable source. Certainly, Lepto is not an everyday, every week, every month diagnosis. But the potential for harm and the understanding that many feel Lepto is on the rise is cause enough to be aware. And cause enough to be protected, don’t you think?

As always, feel free to contact me by email or phone.

All the best,

Stephen E Foster, DVM, CCRT

Foster Animal Hospital, P.A.

Foster Animal Clinic at Parkway Commons

Paws In Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center

730 Concord Parkway North

Concord, NC 28027

704-786-0104

sfoster@fosteranimalhospital.com