Oh my! What big teeth you used to have!

Any given day at the office is full of excitement. My daily schedule offers a variety of healthy and sick pets to keep the day interesting. Every pet is examined from nose to tail at every visit. The mouth is one of the first areas examined.  This one area alone can be be very dangerous to a pet’s health if not cared for properly.

Examining the mouth can be tricky. Not every pet accepts a stranger prying open their mouth. On a good day, I get licked by a happy puppy while examining the mouth. On a bad day, I can only get an eyeball view from afar of a snarling dog or hissing cat.   Despite some resistance at times, I still get a good view of  the mouth and what I see can often be shocking and even heartbreaking.

Gone are the days when I expect to see pearly white teeth.   Those are reserved mainly for puppies and kittens.  Now 1 of every 3 patients has bad breath, plaque and/or gingivitis. Often times I know what to expect the stinkier the pet’s breath.   Heavy amounts of bacteria will cause stinky breath and can lead to dental disease.  Sometimes the level of dental disease can be so severe the teeth actually fall out.  Surprisingly, I have had a pet’s tooth fall out during an exam.  Can you imagine the shock from that owner?  Can you imagine the pain that pet was feeling?  Likely a silent pain, without any obvious clues to the owner.   This is the reason why professional dental cleanings are recommended.  Unfortunately, I am not  always able to convince owners to clean their pets teeth in the early stages of disease.  Before tooth loss is the end result.

Professional dental cleanings are an essential part of a pets dental health care in addition to home care.   Home care includes daily brushing or frequent use of dental treats.  Even with diligent home care,  some pets still build plaque and develop gingivitis.  A professional cleaning is the only way to effectively clean the teeth above and below the gum line.  Delaying a dental cleaning until the teeth “look really bad” can be too late.  This was the case for a recent patient.  After the cleaning and dental x-rays were performed, I had to tell the client that their dog would be losing 17 out of 42 teeth.  Sadly, I have to make a call reporting the need for a tooth extraction far too often.

February is dental month but technically every month should be dental month.  Dental care is essential to keep your pet healthy. It helps your pet avoid heart, liver and kidney disease. And allows your dog and cat to retain all their teeth as long as possible.   Please visit your veterinarian to get an exam to assess your pet’s dental health.  If a dental cleaning is needed, please schedule without delay.

                     

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oh my! What big teeth you used to have!

Any given day at the office is full of excitement. My daily schedule offers a variety of healthy and sick pets to keep the day interesting. Every pet is examined from nose to tail at every visit. The mouth is one of the first areas examined.  This one area alone can be be very dangerous to a pet’s health if not cared for properly.

Examining the mouth can be tricky. Not every pet accepts a stranger prying open their mouth. On a good day, I get licked by a happy puppy while examining the mouth. On a bad day, I can only get an eyeball view from afar of a snarling dog or hissing cat.   Despite some resistance at times, I still get a good view of  the mouth and what I see can often be shocking and even heartbreaking.

Gone are the days when I expect to see pearly white teeth.   Those are reserved mainly for puppies and kittens.  Now 1 of every 3 patients has bad breath, plaque and/or gingivitis. Often times I know what to expect the stinkier the pet’s breath.   Heavy amounts of bacteria will cause stinky breath and can lead to dental disease.  Sometimes the level of dental disease can be so severe the teeth actually fall out.  Surprisingly, I have had a pet’s tooth fall out during an exam.  Can you imagine the shock from that owner?  Can you imagine the pain that pet was feeling?  Likely a silent pain, without any obvious clues to the owner.   This is the reason why professional dental cleanings are recommended.  Unfortunately, I am not  always able to convince owners to clean their pets teeth in the early stages of disease.  Before tooth loss is the end result.

Professional dental cleanings are an essential part of a pets dental health care in addition to home care.   Home care includes daily brushing or frequent use of dental treats.  Even with diligent home care,  some pets still build plaque and develop gingivitis.  A professional cleaning is the only way to effectively clean the teeth above and below the gum line.  Delaying a dental cleaning until the teeth “look really bad” can be too late.  This was the case for a recent patient.  After the cleaning and dental x-rays were performed, I had to tell the client that their dog would be losing 17 out of 42 teeth.  Sadly, I have to make a call reporting the need for a tooth extraction far too often.

February is dental month but technically every month should be dental month.  Dental care is essential to keep your pet healthy. It helps your pet avoid heart, liver and kidney disease. And allows your dog and cat to retain all their teeth as long as possible.   Please visit your veterinarian to get an exam to assess your pet’s dental health.  If a dental cleaning is needed, please schedule without delay.

                     

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paws In Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center- Press Release

Canine Rehabilitation Comes To Concord
02/18/2013
For Immediate Release
Canine Rehabilitation Comes To Concord
Concord, NC – (February 18, 2013) Foster Animal Hospital has been providing Concord with superior veterinary care for over 50 years and is proud to announce certified canine rehabilitation is now available.
Dr. Steve Foster, son of founder Dr. Tom Foster and current co-owner of Foster Animal Hospital, recently became interested in Canine Rehabilitation at a continuing education lecture. “Canine Rehabilitation is very similar to physical therapy and reading about the successes with dogs, I became fully energized to be a part of this exciting new field. I wanted to bring this service to our hospital and our area,” states Dr. Steve Foster. In March 2012, Dr. Foster completed his required courses and completed an internship for certification.
What is Canine Rehab? Basically it is Canine physical therapy. However, physical therapy is a human term; therefore, the appropriate term in veterinary medicine is Canine Rehabilitation. Just as in physical therapy, Canine Rehab helps to restore appropriate functionality to our patients. Whether the issue is due to trauma, a surgical procedure such as anterior cruciate ligament repair, degenerative arthritis, obesity, a neurological issue such as intervertebral disc disease, or others, Canine Rehab can help restore functionality.
After six months of working with local pets and owners, Dr. Foster shared, “The results I have seen have been nothing short of amazing. Patients’ lives have been extended, patients’ quality of life has been markedly improved, and clients are ecstatic that their ‘babies’ are recovering from surgery faster and completely. Geriatric dogs are active and happy again and have a new lease on life. As a veterinary practitioner of almost 28 years, Canine Rehabilitation Therapy is one of the best career decisions I have made. Seeing my patients do so well is especially rewarding. All post-op dogs, neurological cases, and older patients should experience the wonderful benefits of Canine Rehabilitation Therapy.”
Foster Animal Hospital is launching Paws in Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center which will offer full therapy services custom to the pet’s individual needs. From laser to manual therapy, each case is unique. Dr. Foster evaluates each patient to customize a rehab plan in order to reach the owner’s goals for their pet. To find out more, please visit www.fosteranimalhosptial.com or the FAH blog at https://www.fosteranimalhospital.com/blog/
Foster Animal Hospital www.fosteranimalhospital.com
Foster Animal Hospital offers full-service veterinary care and pet services for dogs and cats. We are proud of our more than 50-year reputation in the community, along with our commitment to providing modern, up-to-date veterinary care. Our progressive methods and the latest thinking in pet care make us the #1 choice in Concord, North Carolina

What our clients are sharing…

“I made an appointment with Dr. Steve Foster knowing in my heart that Molly, our 13 year old Lab, only had days to live. Her arthritis had become so bad in her left front elbow and her back legs that I could no longer bear to see her suffer. Through the tears, I explained Molly’s problem. Dr. Steve asked me if I would be willing to try rehabilitation/physical therapy. This was the best thing I have ever done for Molly. After several sessions, her limp is gone and her back legs move independently where before the back legs did the old man shuffle. If you have a dog like Molly it is definitely worth doing therapy. It saved her life. Words cannot express our gratitude.”
~ Michelle

“Our walk was longer and very interesting. Jackson does not sit or lay down which indicates he is more comfortable walking. HOWEVER, he is showing his stubborn streak of planting his feet and refusing to move when he sees something interesting. Last night it was a neighbor’s garden. He was totally focused and standing with his feet firmly planted. It was very hot and I got a little lax with the leash. He sensed the lack of tension and bounded in the garden. He jumped a rabbit!!! The energy was amazing. He didn’t go far and returned when I called him but it was a Jackson miracle. Afterwards, he turned towards home and was ready for water and a nap!”
~ Janice

“My family took me to see Dr. Foster and he thought that I either had severe arthritis in my back and hips and perhaps some neurological deficits which made use of my legs very difficult. He suggested arthritis medicine and pain medicine and then a new program to make an effort to strengthen my legs through physical therapy and rehabilitation. On Mondays and Wednesdays my dad would put me in the front seat beside him and take me into the hospital and I was met by the nicest girls. I was treated like a queen and got a lot of attention. I had a funny haircut so Dr. Foster could do laser therapy to my hips. I did a little better at first and then I had a bad spell where I almost could not get around at all. We took a couple of weeks off and started working hard again. My daddy was worried that I would not improve. He thought it was time to call in hospice. Dr. Steve and I proved him wrong. Mother was happy as I continue to make improvements over the last two months. I still have periods of stumbling and I need a little help getting up the front steps in the house. I now spend more time in the house and get so much more attention. When I go for walks in the neighborhood the cats stay away from me. Neighbors are amazed at how well I get around. I got a new hairdo and bath for the summer. My parents and sister Diana love me so much probably because they realize how close they were to losing me. I cannot say enough good things about the people at the hospital. They have loved me as much as my parents. Dr. Steve has pushed me hard and made me work for all of my improvement. I owe all of my improvement in the quality of my life to Dr. Steve and the girls. Without the new expertise of Dr. Steve and the compassion of everyone, I would probably not be here. Rejuvenated and Rehabilitated Pup, Cleopatra”
~ Dr. Robert

 

Stewie, Step By Step, Part 2

As you may recall from my earlier blog about Stewie, he had surgery to repair a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee. As part of his recovery, we were doing Canine Rehabilitation Therapy to help him recover quickly and completely from this surgery. Once this process is finished, he will do it all over again, as his left knee has a torn cruciate ligament as well!
When we left off, Stewie was half way through his 8 Rehab sessions. At that point in time, he was doing so well, we were able to progress to strengthening exercises.

 

REHAB Session 5: Stewie continues to excel in his recovery. We continued with Passive Range of Motion, stretching, compressions, and massage. We also continued with his early strengthening exercises, but added to the number and type of exercises done. We finished this session with more LASER therapy. As mentioned before, LASER speeds recovery, helps relieve pain and inflammation, and can help revitalize worn or damaged cartilage.

 

REHAB Session 6: Stewie’s session today was very similar to session 5 except today we asked him to start doing exercises unassisted. Up until this point, everything we have done has been by me or assisted by me. At this point, we let Stewie start using the leg un-aided. He did everything as designed. He’s a very energetic and willing patient!

 

REHAB Session 7: Stewie has had 4 days since session 6 and has done well at home. Today, we doubled the number of reps we started last time. He responded expectantly and didn’t appear to have any issues. His rehab is ahead of pace!

 

REHAB Session 8: Stewie’s last day! We continued from session 7 but added more strengthening exercises. Stewie’s leg is stronger and more flexible than ever and he is only 22 days post-op. Even as a Certified Rehab Therapist, I am amazed. We humans certainly can learn a lot from our canine friends. So many have the drive and determination to keep going, even in the face of a severe injury. Way to go Stewie!

 

At this point, we have released Stewie for 4 weeks. His parents have been given several take-home exercises to help Stewie on his road to a full recovery. We are excited about seeing him in 4 weeks and to see the progress he has made!

Steve Foster, DVM, CCRT

Foster Animal Hospital

Paws In Motion Canine Rehabilitation Center

Concord, NC 28027

sfoster@fosteranimalhospital.com

www.fosteranimalhospital.com

www.facebook.com/fosteranimalhospital